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Let’s hear one massive THUNDERCLAP on NET Cancer Day


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Living with NETs – add your voice!  

It’s no secret that I and other patients (Helen and Katia) have been helping Ipsen and their website consultants (Kanga Health) with a new site designed to support and help all Neuroendocrine Tumour patients.  I’m delighted to inform you via this awareness campaign that it will launch on 10 November 2016. The site is very aptly named ‘Living with NETs’. You can have a direct involvement with this campaign too.  Make your voice heard via the Ipsen campaign THUNDERCLAP (click on thunderclap).

Thunderclap is a social media system designed to release a synchronised campaign message at a specific time on a specific day, therefore enhancing and amplifying the message as it reaches hundred of thousands or (hopefully) millions of people within minutes.  It only takes a minute and you can choose which social media platform to use (Facebook, Twitter, Tumbl).  You can also copy and paste to any other source widening the audience even further.  The ability to share your support can also help spread the campaign message and the more people who sign up for this campaign, the louder the THUNDERCLAP will be on 10 Nov.  Let’s make some noise please!  Let’s get the ‘social reach’ of this thunderclap into the millions on 10 Nov 2016 at 3pm CET.

ADD YOUR VOICE TO THE IPSEN THUNDERCLAP CAMPAIGN HERE 

I’m quite excited about this new initiative from Ipsen Group (the manufacturers of Somatuline (Lanreotide)) and not only because I feature on the site but because I sincerely believe it has the potential to be a fantastic facility for anyone interested in NETs, whether they be a patient, a carer, a health worker or anyone who wants to find out more.  And it’s not just learning about NETs, it’s so much more than that.  All will become clear on 10 Nov.

ADD YOUR VOICE TO THE IPSEN THUNDERCLAP CAMPAIGN HERE 

Those who know me best will know that I fervently believe that patient experience and patient stories are the best tools we have for awareness and this site is strong in this element.  Doctors might be the experts in cancer but you’re the expert in how cancer has affected you and your stories contain valuable messages.  Do you know what?  I’m sensing a change in thinking, I’m sensing that more and more people and their organisations are starting to come to the conclusion that patients have a part to play in all sorts of medical areas, we are after all, the most underused people in healthcare.  

On the subject of Doctors, I’m of the solid opinion that we should be working more in partnership with our Doctors whether they know about NETs or not.  I’m delighted to see Ipsen using NET specialists as part of this site and you can hear them talk too!

Please add your voice!   You can help get this THUNDERCLAP to millions by sharing your support.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

ADD YOUR VOICE TO THE IPSEN THUNDERCLAP CAMPAIGN HERE 

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Neuroendocrine Cancer: Hurry up and wait


hurry-up-and-wait

When I was diagnosed with metastatic Neuroendocrine Cancer on 26 July 2010, I just wanted them to hurry up and fix my body so I could get back to normal. That’s what happens to cancer patients with distant metastases is it not? My expectations of what should happen turned out to be wildly inaccurate and in hindsight, I was also wildly naive. You see, with Neuroendocrine Cancer, particularly well-differentiated, low or medium grade tumours, it sometimes doesn’t work as fast as you would think.

The complexity of the condition needs some consideration as the physicians work up a treatment plan. I’m quite happy and content they took their time, rather than rush into the wrong decisions. If you think about it, this is an advantage with low and medium grade NETs……you normally have some time.

Here’s a very short video discussing this during a patient video shoot: Click here.

I had a confirmed biopsy result following some incidental CT scans and other tests. However, they now needed further checks and marker tests to work out the extent of the disease. So the timeline leading up to major surgery ended up like this:

Diagnosis: 26 July 2010.  Grade 2 Small Intestine NET with distant metastasis (Stage 4)

Chromogranin A and 5HIAA: submitted 28 July. Results received 13 Aug – both elevated, indicating and confirming tumour bulk and function status respectively

Octreotide Scan: 17-19 August. Report issued 24 August – confirmed CT plus additional distant hotshots. Also confirmed my tumour receptors were avid to somatostatin analogues.

Daily Octreotide Injections: Started 9 September to control syndrome (derisk surgery)

Referred to NET Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT): 15 September – they now had sufficient data to form a treatment plan.

Holiday:  Late September (it was booked and I felt OK, why not!)

Further MDT assessment: 1- 7 October

Bland Liver Embolisation: 19 October

First Surgery: 9 November – to remove primary and debulk local and regional spread.

You can read the rest of my treatment background here.

So it took 75 days from diagnosis to opening me up to remove the first batch of tumours. With reasonably slow-growing tumours, that isn’t really a long time when you consider they had probably been growing inside me for several years. I’m sure others waited even longer.

Sometimes rushing straight into the operating theatre isn’t really the best option.  I’m still here!

Keep calm and hurry up and wait!

Thanks for reading

Ronny

Hey Guys, I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.

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Did you hear the one about the constipated NET patient?


constipation

did you hear the one about the constipated NET Patient?

It’s a joke right?  Not really and it’s not very funny either!

NET Cancer is very heavily associated with diarrhea, either as a symptom of one of the NET Syndromes (yes there is more than one …..) or as a result of surgery or certain other treatments.  Occasionally, these symptoms and side effects can all combine to make it quite a nasty side effect; and for some a debilitating condition.

In my blog on IBS, I said that many NET Patients were misdiagnosed with this condition prior to their correct diagnosis of NET Cancer.  I also hinted that NET Patients may experience “IBS-like” symptoms after their treatment, particularly following surgery on the GI tract.  I also pointed out that IBS can be diarrhea or constipation based, and there’s also a mixed category.

I must admit to being surprised to find myself with feelings of constipation 4 or 5 years after my treatment and I’ve set about trying to find out why that might be. To understand why I’ve got to this stage, I needed to assess the history of my treatment and what I’ve changed in an attempt to improve my Quality of Life (QoL).

When I underwent my primary surgery (Nov 2010), my surgeon said it would take months for my ‘digestive system’ to return to some form of normality.  I soon found out what he meant, I seemed to be permanently affixed to a toilet seat (plenty of reading opportunities though ….. every cloud!).   I suddenly realised that I needed to start looking seriously at my diet.  I did find some improvements by trying to eat things that would bulk up my stools vs trying to avoid things that might increase frequency (i.e. I wanted a reduction in frequency combined with a bulkier stool). Eventually, I settled on a regime for the first couple of years and to be honest, I didn’t need to change my diet in any radical sense.  I was also determined not to take any medication (I was taking enough) and wanted this to work as natural as possible.

Things were still not ideal and in 2013, I even remember saying to my Oncologist that although I was never misdiagnosed with IBS, I felt like I now had it. I decided to attack this issue following professional advice from one of the eminent experts in the NET specialist dietician world – Tara Whyand.  My regime was now based on science, that is checking the nutrient levels were OK (particularly ADEK and B12), taking supplements to help with deficiencies, tackling things such as malabsorption and diet.

The patient has a big part to play in any improvement strategy, so I also experimented more and completely changed my breakfast and lunch regime to oatmeal/porridge and toast which made a significant difference. I started to avoid eating large meals and I reduced fat consumption generally. I started taking probiotics to counter the effect of any bacterial imbalance as a result of my surgery (i.e. to combat SIBO).  To keep track of everything, I set up and maintained a detailed diary to help identify things making it worse, tinkering as I went along. For those who are contemplating this sort of strategy, let me tell you – it takes time, effort and patience!

At the beginning of this year, I was making excellent progress and my frequency was now once or twice per day – i.e. I felt like a normal bloke 🙂 Quality was not consistently good but I’m of the opinion, this may be something I need to live with. Stomach cramps were reduced, gas and bloating reduced (I’m fairly confident that was down to probiotics). Happy days, my strategy has worked.  I reduced my ‘visits’ by 300% without any medicine. 

However …. have you noticed, there’s always a ‘however’ with NET cancer?

Although I’m generally well, this year has highlighted that the balance is not quite right. My ‘visits’ seem to last longer due to a consistent feeling of incomplete emptying – i.e. movement is OK but is followed by what seems like constipation. Additionally, I’ve had three major episodes of constipation and pain with no ‘movement’ for 24-36 hours. This happened in May, September and December 2016.  My diary now has ‘zero’ entries in the daily bowel movements column, something I never thought I would see again in my lifetime!

When you’ve had small intestinal surgery, as many midgut NET patients have, this sort of thing can be extremely worrying. A bowel obstruction can be dangerous and I’d like to avoid additional surgery at this stage. The second occurrence was more severe and the pain lasted for 1-2 weeks. Fortunately, the issues were eventually settled and appear to have been a result of a sluggish system, although my scans will check to see if any issues in that area might have been contributing. (Note – lactulose (oral) is awful, will never touch it again!)

So … am I a victim of my own dietary regime success?  That’s what I’m currently thinking ….. and I’m intending to work with my health professionals to address this issue. The GP who assessed my constipation and pain in September has told me to stop taking a Calcium/Vit D supplement which was prescribed by the same practice at the beginning of the year (….long story but it was a counter to an osteoporosis risk that I have via long-term use of Clexane blood thinners).  I already get enough calcium and vitamin D through the normal channels plus supplements, so low risk.  I also upped my dosage of probiotics earlier this year from 5 billion to 20 billion as I remember that had a minor effect on gas and frequency improvement. I’ve reversed that to see what happens, and going OK so far.  I’m now tinkering with my diet again, reducing my fibre intake and then build up again slowly. Additionally, I could probably do with more exercise and more water!  Perhaps my Lanreotide is having some effect too?

Is it just me with constipation issues? No, I carried out some covert searches on forums and found this issue has been mentioned numerous times.  I’ll keep this blog live and hopefully find a resolution.

I seem to remember a few years ago thinking constipation would be a luxury.  I can assure you it isn’t – things need to keep moving, the opposite is much worse!

I suspect we need science and some specialist NET research in this area, not sure the over the counter prescription is the optimum solution.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

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Neuroendocrine Cancer – were you irritated by your misdiagnosis?


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Look on any site about Neuroendocrine Tumours (NETs) and you’ll find the term IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) frequently mentioned. That’s because it’s a common misdiagnosis for many before being formally diagnosed with NETs.

But what exactly is IBS, why is it such a common misdiagnosis for many NET patients and how can these misdiagnoses be prevented or reduced in future?  I just spent a few hours doing an online training course on IBS and I want to pass on some stuff I found to be very useful. I have never been diagnosed with IBS but having researched the issue through some training, I can understand why it might be in the thoughts of a general practitioner for many scenarios.  Much of my research was focussed on the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) who sponsored the online course I completed which also used material from their magazine Gut, a leading international journal in gastroenterology.

What is IBS?

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, long-term condition of the digestive system. It can cause bouts of stomach cramps, bloating and excessive wind, diarrhoea and/or constipation, feeling of incomplete emptying, mucus in stool; and many other symptoms (see NHS IBS siteThe symptoms vary between individuals and affect some people more severely than others. They tend to come and go in periods lasting a few days to a few months at a time, often during times of stress or after eating certain foods.  IBS is a heterogeneous condition with a range of treatments.  There are in fact different classifications of IBS and the diagram below supports the list with some context:

    • IBS-D – diarrhea based
    • IBS-C – constipation based
    • IBS-M – mix of both diarrhea and constipation

ibs-types

You can see why someone presenting with diarrhea or IBS-D type symptoms might be automatically assumed to have IBS despite the fact that these symptoms could also apply to many other conditions including several cancers.  However, what I also found is that in the UK, there is now updated guidance from NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) to aid GPs and other physicians on how to properly diagnose IBS.  In fact, the online course I undertook is one of many now being offered to medical staff as part of the new guidance. That sounds like a good thing in practice (although I did notice some differences between the BSG recommendations and what is published by NICE…….. £ )

How is IBS diagnosed?

That is considerably complex as the symptoms are fairly general.  However, I was encouraged to find that doctors should assess any ‘red flag’ indicators that would need referral to secondary care before any firm decision on IBS was made. These include (but not limited to), unintentional and unexplained weight loss, rectal bleeding, family history of bowel or ovarian cancer, a change in bowel habit to looser and/or more frequent stools persisting for more than 6 weeks in a person aged over 60 years, anaemia, abdominal masses, rectal masses, inflammatory markers for inflammatory bowel disease.  That’s very interesting because in 2010, after mentioning some unintentional weight loss, my GP said ‘anaemia’ to me and referred me to secondary care.  Perhaps I was lucky but perhaps, my GP’s team were just professional and thorough?  That said, if you’re with me so far, you can see why IBS might be an easy diagnosis to make for someone presenting with either diarrhea/constipation issues with no other obvious symptoms or abnormal test results (particularly IBS-D).

Why might NETs be frequently misdiagnosed as IBS?

Using the NICE guidelines, I noted there are a range of tests to preclude other diagnoses including: full blood count (FBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) or plasma viscosity, c‑reactive protein (CRP), antibody testing for Coeliac disease. Whilst abnormal results of these tests might show up something to investigate further (i.e. FBC – haemoglobin worked for me), none of them include looking ‘inside’ the patient and I guess there is a resource/finance issue involved here.

In fact, the guidelines also list a number of tests that are NOT necessary to confirm a diagnosis of IBS. These include: ultrasound, rigid/flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, barium enema, thyroid function test, faecal ova and parasite test, faecal occult blood, hydrogen breath test.  You can see the issues ………..

The guidelines go on to say that a diagnosis of IBS should be considered only if the person has abdominal pain or discomfort that is either relieved by defecation or associated with altered bowel frequency or stool form. This should be accompanied by at least two of the following four symptoms:

  • altered stool passage (straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation)
  • abdominal bloating (more common in women than men), distension, tension or hardness
  • symptoms made worse by eating
  • passage of mucus.

    Other features such as lethargy, nausea, backache and bladder symptoms are common in people with IBS, and may be used to support the diagnosis

I also noted that the causes of IBS are inextricably linked with Psychological issues and the guidance also includes therapies including cognitive behavioural therapies (CBT) relaxation therapies, and hypnosis.

So if you’re one of the unlucky ones who has presented with “IBS like” symptoms and have normal test results as per above, you may not get the opportunity to get to further testing to find the true diagnosis. It’s possible that you saw a physician who has not followed guidelines for diagnosing IBS if indeed such guidelines were available to him/her.  The inclusion of psychological issues also connects with many anecdotal stories of NET patients being told they needed psychological help before eventually being diagnosed with NETs.

I can see many similarities in the descriptions of IBS symptoms and the sort of things you can read on NET forums – strangely including the effects of NET Cancer surgery and other treatment after diagnosis.

Slight digression but if this subject is of interest, you may like to comment.  I once said to my Oncologist that I felt as if I had IBS since my surgery and somatostatin analogue treatment. In fact, I told him that I thought my bowel was more than irritated, it was bloody angry 🙂  During my research, I couldn’t help noticing that some of the suggestions and recommendations for IBS are similar to that offered to a post surgical NET patient.  You may therefore like my blog series on Nutrition which was co-authored by a NET specialist dietician who is also IBS aware.

Preventing or Reducing a Misdiagnosis of IBS (all illnesses)

The course looked at this angle as it was clearly keen to emphasise this to medical people going through the module.  The NICE guidelines read like a process which must be strictly followed but at the end of the day, they are just ‘guidance’ and should not stop doctors thinking outside the box.

A recent study suggested that as many as 1 in 6 patients (~16%) with symptoms of IBS had another disease.  Approximately 7% had Crohn’s disease, 3% coeliac disease, and 2% microscopic colitis when they were formally tested. Patients with IBS-diarrhoea predominant more often had abnormalities than those with IBS-constipation predominant (interesting for NETs).  The paper stresses the importance of tailored investigation of patients presenting for the first time.

One in six patients with symptoms compatible with IBS without alarm features in this selected group exhibited organic GI disease following investigation. Assessment of alarm features in a comprehensive history is vital to reduce diagnostic uncertainty that can surround IBS. You can, if you wish, read the abstract of the paper on the link below.

The issue here is that people not meeting the criteria for further checks may be precluded for scans and other tests due to lack of clinical evidence and their diagnosis of IBS will stand.  As this was a study, clearly some of them might have gone on to present with sufficient clinical evidence to warrant more checks and subsequent diagnosis of something else at a more advanced stage.  Clearly this sounds familiar with NETs.  However, looking at the figures above, I suspect the figures for NETs IBS misdiagnoses are pretty small in comparison to those who are correctly diagnosed with IBS.  To put that into context (in the UK), according to the NHS, IBS is thought to affect up to one in five people (10,000,000) at some point in their life, and it usually first develops when a person is between 20 and 30 years of age and around twice as many women are affected as men.  Compare that with a UK NETs prevalence of around 25-35,000 (guesstimate).  However, one misdiagnosis is one too many. 

Summary

Having done this course and read the accompanying references (some only abstracts), I can see the scope for people with many different illnesses being misdiagnosed with IBS. However, the use of alarm symptoms and ref flag indicators should be helping to reduce this. I’m guessing that many people in first line care may not be fully aware of the IBS guidelines to be able to take heed.  I’m also guessing that in the UK (at least), a 10 minute appointment with a busy GP is just not going to solve some of these symptom clashes and many visits might be required to move forward.

It’s really difficult to advise anyone going through a diagnosis of IBS as to how to approach a physician who says they have IBS and they think this is wrong.  In the case of NETs, other cardinal symptoms may be of use in convincing physicians (e.g. flushing).  Armed with this knowledge, I would say to anyone who suspects NETs but are faced with an IBS diagnosis, take a copy of the BSG and NICE guidelines to your doctor and tick off all the differential ‘ref flag’ and ‘alarms’ issues ensuring that each has been tested before accepting the IBS diagnosis.

References used to support compilation of this blog:

NHS Site – IBS

The IBS online course (it may expire depending on when you read this post)

Prevalence of organic disease at colonoscopy in patients with symptoms compatible with irritable bowel syndrome: cross-sectional survey (abstract only, not full article)

BSG Guidelines on the irritable bowel syndrome: mechanisms and practical management (full article)

NICE Guidance – Irritable bowel syndrome in adults

 

Thanks for reading

 

Ronny Allan

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.

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Steve Jobs – the most famous Neuroendocrine Cancer Ambassador we NEVER had


steve-jobs-55-to-2011

Steve Jobs died 5 Oct 2011.  RIP Steve, you certainly made a difference to the world of technology and that is still being felt today.  I have a number of google alerts setup and every day the emails arrive in my inbox. The longest email is always the Steve Jobs one, i.e. Steve Jobs is written about more than Neuroendocrine Cancer and other connected subjects. That’s interesting because Neuroendocrine Cancer is the type Steve had, not Pancreatic as is frequently reported.

I’ve mentioned Steve Jobs a few times previously, mainly in my blog The Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer. I wrote that blog when I was frustrated at the constant misreporting of Neuroendocrine Cancer as other types of cancer. Others included Nick Robinson (see blog The Devil is in the Detail) and Wilko Johnson (The Ecstasy of Wilko Johnson).  I’ve also suggested in my blog ‘Every Day is NET Cancer Day’ that we need high-profile patient Ambassadors and despite his death, Steve Jobs would have been quite a catch, had he been willing. Curiously, the same thing is happening with Dag Kittlaus (Siri creator) who was diagnosed with a pNET last year.

A lot has been written about Steve’s cancer experience and much of it is full of ‘what ifs’. However, I’d like to focus on the facts that are known and we can be almost certain about. That said, the precise detail that we (as NET patients) might want, is probably only to be found in Steve Jobs’s medical documents.

Diagnosis

How was it found?  In 2003, Steve was having a CT scan to examine his kidneys and ureter, as he had developed recurrent kidney stones beginning in the late 1990s. A suspicious lesion was spotted on his pancreas. To cut a long story short, he eventually had more specialist scans and then a biopsy which diagnosed a type of Neuroendocrine Tumour.  There are many mentions of Insulinoma, a pNET which is reported to have a 10% malignancy rate (ISI Book – Woltering et al). It isn’t clear whether Steve had any presentational symptoms of an Insulinoma at this point (i.e. hypoglycemia).  There is also some chatter online about his tumour being a Glucagonoma (another type of pNET).

Initial Treatment

Steve initially tried alternative medicine before having surgery 9 months after diagnosis. There are reports of his medical team urging surgery earlier and his biographer stated that Steve had later regretted this delay. One of his Doctors is reported to have said “Steve was a very thoughtful person. In deciding whether or not to have major surgery, and when, he spent a few months consulting with a number of physicians and scientists worldwide as well as his team of superb physicians. It was his decision to do this”.  He is reported to have gone on to have a ‘Whipple’ type operation in 2004.  It was only then, that his condition was made public.  During that operation, 3 lesions were reported on his liver.

Ongoing Treatment and Surveillance

Most NET patients enter this phase after their initial treatment, it’s also the period where you learn about the cancer and how best to live with it.  There’s not much written about Jobs’ illness between his surgery and his liver transplant but my research uncovered a useful timeline from Bloomberg and other sources:

June 12, 2005: Jobs talks about his fight with cancer during a commencement speech at Stanford University. He says he was diagnosed about a year earlier and that doctors told him he wouldn’t live longer than six months. The cancer turned out to be a form that was treatable with surgery, “and I’m fine now,” he says. Source Bloomberg.  {Author’s note:  an indication he had been told, or his doctors knew, it was a Neuroendocrine Tumor}

January 24, 2006:  Walt Disney chief executive Bob Iger knew early on that Steve Jobs’s cancer had returned and kept it a secret before it became public knowledge, a new biography of Apple’s late chief executive reveals. The day the deal was officially announced, Mr Iger said he was at Pixar’s headquarters for the ceremony when Jobs asked to go for a private walk. On a secluded part of the Californian campus Jobs put his arm around Mr Iger’s shoulder and revealed his cancer was back. “Frankly, they tell me I’ve got a 50-50 chance of living five years,” the Disney CEO quoted Jobs as saying. Source

June 9, 2008: Jobs, while introducing the iPhone 3G at Apple’s developers’ conference, appears thinner and frail. The company blames a “common bug.”

July 21, 2008: Responding to concerns about Jobs’s appearance, Apple says he has no plans to leave the company and that his health is a private matter. Investors aren’t reassured, and the shares fall 10 percent.

July 23, 2008: The New York Times reports that Jobs has been telling associates and Apple’s board he is cancer-free. Jobs had a surgical procedure earlier in the year to address a problem that contributed to his weight loss, the newspaper reports, citing unnamed people close to the executive. The shares climb 2.6 percent.

July 26, 2008: New York Times columnist Joe Nocera writes that he spoke two days earlier on the phone with Jobs, who said his health problems weren’t life-threatening. Jobs declines to go on the record about the nature of his ailment.

Sept. 9, 2008: Jobs, introducing new iPod media players at an event in San Francisco, still looks thin. “Reports of my death are greatly exaggerated,” Jobs jokes. Munster says that while the CEO’s appearance is unchanged since June, “Just the fact that Steve Jobs was up there was a positive.”

Oct. 3, 2008: A posting on CNN’s citizen journalist Web site, called iReport.com, says Jobs has been rushed to the hospital after a “major heart attack.” The shares fall 5.4pc. The stock rebounds after Apple says the report is false.

Dec. 16, 2008: Apple says that Jobs won’t be giving his usual speech at the Macworld conference, renewing concerns about his health. Jobs had used the forum to introduce new products for 11 straight years.

Jan. 5, 2009: Jobs says he is suffering from a hormone imbalance, causing him to lose weight. Jobs vows to remain CEO during treatment. “The remedy for this nutritional problem is relatively simple and straightforward,” Jobs says in an open letter.

Jan. 14, 2009: Jobs gives up day-to-day operations to Cook until June, saying his health problems are more complex than originally thought. Jobs says he will remain involved in major strategic decisions. “I look forward to seeing all of you this summer,” he says in a letter to employees.

By this stage, his cancer is already starting to take its toll on how he looks.

The disease takes its toll over the years

Liver Transplant

It is common knowledge that Jobs had a liver transplant in 2009 in Tennessee (he was on the list in California and Tennessee).  In between his Whipple and then, he appears to have lived (and worked) with his disease and it’s consequences. His issues appear to have been exacerbated by his excessive vegan diet/fads and the effects of the Whipple surgery (many of you will be aware of these effects). For example, he would spend weeks eating the same thing and then suddenly change his mind and stop eating it. He’d also go on fasts. His condition immediately prior to the liver transplant was said to be ‘poor’ and losing more weight (he had been noticeably thinner for some time).

Post-Liver Transplant

In 2010, Jobs started to feel sick again. He would lose his appetite and begin to feel pains throughout his body. His doctors would do tests, detect nothing, and reassure him that he still seemed clear.  In early November 2010, he was in pain, stopped eating and had to be fed intravenously by a nurse who came to his house. The doctors found no sign of more tumours, and they assumed that this was just another of his periodic cycles of fighting infections and digestive maladies.

Heres’ a great bunch of TV interviews (something Jobs didn’t do very often). The final one was in 2010.  “The last few years have reminded me that life is fragile”.  Click here (worth watching the whole 10 minutes).

steve jobs 2010

The last few years have reminded me that life is fragile

The End

In early 2011, doctors detected the recurrence that was causing these symptoms. Ultimately, he developed liver, bone, and other metastases.  He had a further extended leave of absence from his job before stepping down as Apple CEO in Aug,  Steve Jobs eventually died 5 Oct 2011.

References

Notwithstanding the Pancreatic Cancer vs Neuroendocrine Cancer issue, I carried out my research mainly using two articles of the many you can find out there:

  1.  “And one more thing” about Steve Jobs’ battle with cancer
    This is a long article and totally fascinating.  Some of the evidence is presented using extracts from Walter Isaacson’s book ‘Steve Jobs’
  2. A Tumor Is No Clearer in Hindsight.  This article comes to similar conclusions than the one above but it’s shorter and easier to read. It’s from the New York times and was written after the dust settled on Jobs’ death (i.e. when more facts were available). There is also input to this article from NET specialists Dr Wolin and Dr Libutti.

  3. Apple chief Steve Jobs: Health timeline since 2003.  This article is from a UK National Newspaper (The Telegraph) but via US Business Publication Bloomberg.

Personal Summary

“A tumor is no clearer in hindsight” is a good summary on the basis that I would have liked much more detail!  During my research, I found many mentions of Insulin as stated above but only one or two mentioning Glucagon, a hormone associated with another pNET type – Glucagonoma. However, looking at this tumor type in the ISI Book (Woltering et al) and the Jobs diagnostic and treatment story, I have some doubts whether this was the precise tumor type. I have some other searches in progress hoping to find something concrete.

Thinking Differently There is no doubt that Steve Jobs was an amazing and very interesting character.  You just can’t see Apple being the Apple it is today without his intervention.  He was famous for being ‘unconventional’ and ‘thinking different’ and I get that element of his character.  I just can’t help thinking that perhaps he should have been more ‘conventional’ with this thinking and approach to treating his cancer. However, we just don’t know what advice he was receiving and what advice he accepted or rejected.  As for the ‘Pancreatic Cancer’ thing – I’ve said this before, I believe patients only say or interpret what their doctors say to them in regards cancer type.

“The most famous patient ambassador we never had”.  I don’t mean any disrespect by that, I’m just emphasising that we need so much more awareness of our cancer and a high-profile patient could do so much to help in this area. If he was so inclined, Steve would have been a fantastic advocate for Neuroendocrine Cancer and there’s an area where perhaps thinking different might be the way ahead. However, I have a suspicion that very famous people don’t really want to talk about their illness and Steve Jobs might even perceive that as a weakness.

And one more thing …….  you may also find this article useful.  It’s titled “And one more thing”

Thanks for reading

Ronny Allan

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.

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My Diagnosis and Treatment History

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Neuroendocrine Cancer: Patient Power!


patient-storiesThere’s a saying that the patient is the most underused person in healthcare and I think there’s a lot of truth in that. However, I would suggest with Neuroendocrine Cancer, it’s less true than for many other cancers. There are so many NET Cancer patients out there who know quite a lot about their cancer, and in some detail. Even the great Dr Liu once said that NET Patients frequently know more about NET Cancer than their doctors.
If you go onto Twitter, if you go onto Facebook, if you read newspaper stories, you will find cancer patient stories in abundance and they will normally be patients diagnosed with the big 4 cancers. This is not surprising as these tend to affect more people.  However, the ratio of NET Cancer patient stories still does not seem to be right.  I’m not ‘dissing’ breast, lung, bowel and prostate cancer patients, all credit to them for pushing their cancer awareness – respect!
I truly believe that patient stories, whether they are written, presented live or recorded for mass media, are an extremely valuable tool in spreading awareness of NET Cancer.  A ‘human being’ talking is a thousand times more potent than the endless stream of ‘memes’ and cartoons that seem to pervade our community – one reason why I don’t use them on my own site. It’s also the reason why I always jump at the opportunity to tell my story, because it’s real, it’s factual and I’m sensing an increasing willingness from the medical and healthcare communities to use patients in this way.  Quite right too, patients have a lot to offer.
Ipsen presentation
I’ve been video’d several times in the past 12 months and one day you might actually get to see those, there are some contractual reasons why I cannot yet share them with you.  It’s quite a scary thing to do and I found it mentally exhausting – but very worthwhile.
I was therefore delighted to find this recently published group of videos from Cure Connect.  Within the clips, there are 2 patients stories, one Pancreatic NET (pNET) and one Carcinoid and they are interspersed and integrated by input from NET specialist Dr. Reidy-Lagunes (a very knowledgeable and enthusiastic speaker).  Each clip is only around 5 minutes long so not too taxing.  The pNET patient, Michael, is a great supporter of my blog and one of the first NET patients I met on twitter.  I’m very thankful to him for alerting me to the videos.  Dr Reidy-Lagunes is fast becoming a ‘fav’ of mine and I note she emphasises some of the things I’ve been consistently saying in my blogs; i.e. this cancer can be treated and it’s not as rare as people think.
 ccf-logo
Another bonus is the addition of Carcinoid Cancer Foundation (CCF) and my friend Grace Goldstein.  CCF is the largest and most respected NET Cancer organisation on the planet and Grace works tirelessly to spread awareness and help patients including me!  CCF was the first site I found and remains my go-to site today.
Well done Michael and Brenda.  Thanks also to Dr. Reidy-Lagunes, Grace Goldstein/CCF and Cure Connect for once again highlighting our cancer. 
Take your pick!

 

Thanks for reading and watching!

Ronny Allan

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