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In the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life


The first question to the first ever joint patient-physician symposium

In the last 12-24 months, there seems to have been announcement after announcement of new and/or upgraded/enhanced diagnostics and treatment types for Neuroendocrine Cancer.  Increased availability of radionuclide scans, increased availability of radionuclide therapies, combination therapies, increased availability of somatostatin analogues, biological therapies, enhanced surgical and minimally invasive techniques, new oral drugs for carcinoid syndrome, more trials including immunotherapy.  Admittedly, some of the announcements are just expansions of existing therapies having been approved in new regions. Compared to some other cancers, even those which hit the headlines often, we appear to be doing not too badly. However, the pressure needs to stay on, all patients, regardless of where they live, need access to the best diagnostics and treatments for them; and at the requisite time. This alone is one very big unmet need in a whole range of countries still lacking.

The ‘War on Cancer’ forgot about Neuroendocrine

The ‘war on cancer’ has been around for the last 50 years, it’s still being waged.  There are now more ‘fronts’ and it’s taking longer than thought to find the ‘cure’. The recently announced Cancer Moonshot initiative is a timely ‘reinforcement’.  Despite this 50 year war, it seems like there’s only been a war on Neuroendocrine Cancer for the last 10 of those years. I guess they were focussed on the big cancers and/or the seemingly impossible ‘universal cure’.  Prior to that, for NETs, there is only evidence of some skirmishes, more like guerrilla warfare. Now we have a developed nuclear capability!  I believe the turning point was the SEER database work carried out by Dr James Yao who confirmed the incidence had grown by 400% in 3 decades, i.e. confirming it was no longer rare.

Let’s not forget about the consequences of cancer

It is true that half of people diagnosed with cancer now survive for at least ten years. Many live for years with cancer, on ‘watch and wait’ or going through various treatments and tests; their future remaining uncertain.  For this group, and even for those whose treatment has successfully removed or shrunk their tumour, the struggle with the consequences and late effects of cancer and its treatment can last for years.  Many Neuroendocrine Cancer patients fit into this category.

This is why I was very pleased to hear about the new International Neuroendocrine Cancer Alliance (INCA) campaign to not only address the ‘unmet’ needs of NET patients but to undertake to do it alongside NET specialists representing regional groupings.  I was also extremely happy to have been invited as a guest of INCA to attend the first ever joint patient physician seminar hosted by ENETS followed by the annual INCA summit where doctors were also invited to form a panel for the first session. It’s worth remembering that I’m not an advocate organisation, not part of the INCA alliance, nor do I represent any organisation on this blog.  I’m simply ronnyallan.com

Unmet Needs for NETs

There’s a lot of treatments for Neuroendocrine Cancer out there, just not everyone has access to them – therefore an unmet need at the international level.  Others are earlier diagnosis, access to multi-disciplinary teams (MDT), ability to access quality information at diagnosis and beyond including clinical trials, funding, accurate national registries to improve statistics.  One area where I feel there is a huge unmet need is in the area of patient support following diagnosis.  Although some countries are more advanced than others in this area, even in the so-called advanced countries, there are huge gaps in provision of long-term support for those living with Neuroendocrine Cancer. For example, physicians need to focus more on:

Late diagnosis. People will be dealing from the effects of late diagnosis which has resulted in metastatic disease – and some people will have been fighting misdiagnosed illnesses for years.  That takes its toll.

Consequences of Surgery. People will have had surgery which in many cases is life changing – various bits of the gut (gastrointestinal tract) are now missing, lungs are now missing – many other locations will have been excised or partly excised.  These bits of our anatomy were there for a purpose and QoL takes a hit when they are chopped out.

Inoperable Tumours and Syndromes. People will be dealing with remnant and/or inoperable tumours which may or may not be producing an associated NET syndrome (some of the symptoms can be rather debilitating in the worst cases)

Consequences of Non-surgical Treatment.  Additionally, people will be dealing with the side effects of multi-modal non surgical treatments, such as somatostatin analogue hormone therapy (Octreotide/Lanreotide), chemotherapy, biological therapy (mTOR inhibitors) (i.e. Everolimus (Afinitor)), biological therapy (protein kinase inhibitors (i.e. Sunitinib (Sutent)), radionuclide therapy (i.e. PRRT).  Whilst it’s great there are a wide range of therapies, they all come with side effects.

Secondary Illnesses and Comorbidities. Some people will have gained secondary illnesses in part due to the original cancer or treatment – e.g. somatostatin analogue hormone therapy can have a side effect of increasing blood sugar to diabetic levels.  There are many other examples.

Finances. NET Cancer can be an expensive cancer to treat and this is exacerbated by the length of time the treatment lasts.  Whilst people have access to free public services or private insurance, many people will end up out-of-pocket due to their cancer.  Over time, this adds up.

Emotional Aspects. Many NET patients are kept under surveillance for the remainder of their lives.  With that comes the constant worry that the cancer progresses, tumours get bigger, new tumours show up, treatments are denied (i.e. PRRT in the UK).  It’s no surprise that anxiety and depression can affect many patients in these situations. To some extent, there can be a knock-on effect to close family members and carers where applicable.

As I said in my question above (see picture), even if you found a cure for NETs tomorrow, it will not replace the bits of my GI tract excised as part of my treatment.  For many people, even ‘beating’ cancer might not feel much like a ‘win’.  It’s a two-way street though – we need to work with our doctors, trying to change lifestyles to cope better with some of these issues.  This is why it’s really important to complete patient surveys. However, my point is this, more research into some of these issues (e.g. nutrition, drug dosage) and earlier patient support to help understand and act on these issues, would be good starters.

“Adding life to years is as important as adding years to life”

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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NETwork with Ronny © – Newsletter February 2017


network-with-ronny

Hi NETworkers!

Welcome to my fourth ‘community’ newsletter, the monthly summary of NET news, views and ICYMI (in case you missed it!).

February was a slower month in blogging terms due to a major increase in contact from people privately asking for advice and others asking me to support external projects. I don’t have an issue with private contact but please note my disclaimer. I also had a winter cold for a few days, so I relaxed a bit. Only a short month but I managed to accumulate the second biggest monthly blog views ever (January 2017 will be difficult to beat).  Thank you all so much 

January’s success also led to increased Facebook followers and I broke through the 4000 milestone with a plan to reach 5000 by the end of the year or before.  If I grew at January’s rate, it could easily be 6000 but that’s probably wishful thinking!

The month ended with a bang!  The long-awaited FDA approval of ‘XERMELO’ (Telotristat Ethyl) was announced yesterday. Check out my blog which has all the links you need in one area.  Click here to read

New Blogs Published

Due to the vagaries of Facebook inner workings, some of these may not have even shown on your Facebook timeline.  So, ICYMI …….here’s a summary with links:

Other News in Feb 2017

New Audiences for NET Cancer.  From Day 1, I said it was my aim to find new audiences for NETS rather than just share stuff within our own community.

  • I’m ‘extremely’ active on twitter and I find a lot of my research stuff there.  I also use it to support other conditions and it’s mostly returned (i.e. others help with NET awareness).   There is so much on twitter that I could swamp the community Facebook site so I started a twitter newsletter via an app called Nuzzel which seeks out stuff I normally like.  Click this link and sign up if you think this is something you’d be interested in receiving.  I reached 100 email subscribers today!
  • I’m making new friends in the interventional radiologist community having been invited to join their twitter chat.  That turned out to be profitable as I won $40 of Starbucks e-gifts for being a quick tweeter!  I now have some new friends who are producing a video featuring a NET Patient (will bring you details in due course) and I’m learning more about these technologies from reading their tweets – I had no idea how many different jobs these guys do!
  • I’m proud to have been asked to become a ‘Community Champion’ on the Macmillan Cancer Support Forum.  I’ll be reporting more on this in the coming weeks.

Patients Included.  A new campaign for 2017.  I’m very excited to have been invited to the first ever joint Patient-Physician symposium at the annual ENETS conference in Barcelona 8 – 11 March.  I’m being sponsored by the International Neuroendocrine Cancer Alliance (INCA). I’ll be tweeting and posting stuff live from the conference, look out for this.

Blog Milestone.  Accelerated viewing figures should put me into a quarter of a million blog views by the end of this month! Thank you all so much Keep sharing!

Facebook Milestone.  My Facebook page is now my biggest outlet for awareness and education so please please please recommend this page to anyone you think would be interested.  The picture of the invite button shown here is an example from a windows computer, it may differ on other platforms.

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Instagram

I’m expanding into Instagram to see how that goes.  Initially I’ll just be posting pictures of things that inspire me, mostly scenic photos of places I’ve been or want to go!   You can follow me here:  Click here to go to my Instagram page

Figures

Where did February Blog views come from? – Top 10 countries:

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For interest the 10 Ten Facebook followers by Country:

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Thanks for your great support in February.

Ronny

Hey Guys, I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

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