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The Invisible Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Population 


I found some of the quotes from the recent NET SEER Database study very interesting.  The National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program is a comprehensive source of population-based information initiated in 1973 that is updated annually.  The NET study is formally titled “Trends in the Incidence, Prevalence, and Survival Outcomes in Patients With Neuroendocrine Tumors in the United States” (authored by Arvind Dasari, MD, MS; Chan Shen, PhD; Daniel  Halperin, MD; et al). Although the study is US-based, it did represent the largest study of Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs) ever recorded. Other national declarations of incidence and prevalence of NETs seem to bear these statistics out.

I covered the increasing incidence and prevalence extensively in my post “Neuroendocrine Tumors – not as rare as you think“.  I looked at USA and beyond. Those who are regular readers of my articles will already know I’ve been ‘banging on’ about this for a few years. Other organisations and individuals (including NET specialists) are now indicating these tumors are not rare, some vindication for my aforementioned ‘banging on’.

There are two further quotes which I’d like to focus on in this article:

1. From the NET SEER Database study published 2017:

…… many cases of NETs may not have been reported to cancer registries unless considered malignant…… it is likely that we have underestimated their true incidence and prevalence

2. From Dana Farber (Kulke, Chan):

“Estimated more than 200,000 undiagnosed cases in the US”

But what do these quotes actually mean?  Here’s my take!

Underestimating the true incidence and prevalence of NETs

When I studied the latest SEER NET data, I saw the authors were aware of the well-known faults in cancer registries worldwide and the effect this has on the true incidence and prevalence of Neuroendocrine Cancer.  These issues, which are a worldwide problem, include the incorrect registration of Neuroendocrine Cancer as other types based on the anatomical location of the primary tumor (e.g. a Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Pancreas is recorded as Pancreatic Cancer).  At this point, you may wish to check out my post “The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer” which provides some real life examples of the confusion between primary Neuroendocrine location and other cancers. That said, things are definitely improving because the latest SEER data shows a marked increase in the incidence of High Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinomas (NEC), an area where this issue is prevalent. A similar increase in NEC was also illustrated in the UK’s figures from Public Health England (PHE) in 2016 (click here) indicating that cancer registries are getting better and not before time (although it has to be said this only came about in UK due to a major intervention by NET Patient Foundation and others).

But there’s another issue impacting whether a diagnosis is actually entered on a cancer registry or not.  Unfortunately, there are members of the medical community who still see well differentiated NETs as benign tumors, ‘not a proper cancer’ and some of them are still living in last centuries ‘Carcinoid World’.  You can occasionally be excused for being out of date but being 7 years (plus) out of date is unacceptable.  The WHO 2010 classification for NETs was based on the concept that all NETs have malignant potential.  Here’s a quote from the UKINETS Guidelines in 2011 (Ramage, Caplin, Meyer, Grossman, et al).

Tumours should be classified according to the WHO 2010 classification (Bosman FT, Carneiro F, Hruban RH, et al. WHO Classification of Tumours of the Digestive System. Lyon: IARC, 2010). This classification is fundamentally different from the WHO 2000 classification scheme, as it no longer combines stage related information with the two-tiered system of well and poorly differentiated NETs. The WHO 2010 classification is based on the concept that all NETs have malignant potential, and has therefore abandoned the division into benign and malignant NETs and tumours of uncertain malignant potential.

The guidance in WHO 2017 reinforces this statement.

The undiagnosed NET patient population

From above, you can see why the incidence (and therefore the prevalence) of our disease has almost definitely been underestimated.  However, that’s not the end of my story……..

A number of statements are clear about Neuroendocrine Tumors:

  • Low/Intermediate grade well differentiated tumors are known to have been growing slowly over a number of years before discovery or accurate diagnosis occurs,
  • They can be difficult to diagnose,
  • They are not that well-known amongst the general medical population,
  • Many people are initially misdiagnosed with another condition, with some this will result in late presentation with metastatic disease.
  • Many NETs are found during autopsies.

It’s worth pointing out that one of the conclusions made by the recent SEER NET study is that the increase in incidence and prevalence can be attributed to a number of factors including earlier diagnosis.  This is of course excellent news.  Another conclusion of the study is that we are all living longer, reflecting improvements in therapies.  This is also great news and is a factor in increased prevalence figures.

For example, in USA, a respected NET specialist stated that the autopsy find for ‘carcinoid’ is 4 times the recorded diagnosis rate. In Australia, one study claimed that 0.05% of all autopsies found a Pheochromocytoma or Paraganglioma.  What is missing from these statements is whether the previously undiscovered tumors had been causing symptoms and the person either lived with them or had been misdiagnosed for something else during their lifetime.

Given the factors above, it’s also clear that many more diagnoses are on the way – as confirmed in the insightful (and brave) statement in the slide below.  It’s also worth pointing out that the latest SEER NETs reported that the increase in incidence is due to earlier diagnosis, so in many ways we are finding some of the ‘invisible’ NET patient population.  What this also says is that the figure of 200,000 was perhaps much higher 10 or 20 years ago.

Summary

I suspect there’s an invisible patient population for many conditions but the slow-growing and relatively quiet nature of Neuroendocrine Cancer means there could be a significant undiagnosed burden walking around, looking for a diagnosis, putting up with symptoms and being treated for other conditions. I see people on forums looking for clues, social media can sometimes be helpful here. That said, I do get the feeling some do not have NETs, regardless of the symptoms they associate with the disease, but I guess many of them will go on to be formally diagnosed with something. I’m contacted by many ‘undiagnosed’ people on my own blog and supporting Facebook sites (mostly privately) and I can tell you that’s a tough gig.  I only hope I’ve given them some useful ideas about where to look or what to ask/suggest.

Clearly more awareness is required to catch more people earlier and from the latest SEER NET study, it appears this is starting to work.  I feel earlier diagnosis is partly due to increased awareness, particularly in the medical world. I would also suggest it has improved in the general population due to the explosion of social media information dissemination. It’s also accurate to suggest that improvements in diagnostic capabilities are also playing their part in pushing up incidence rates, just as improved therapies have pushed up prevalence rates, something emphasised by Dasari (et al) in the recent SEER Data study.

The issues caused by inefficient registries together with ‘the undiagnosed’, suggest there is a large invisible NET patient population out there ……. we just need to find them!

Thanks for reading

Ronny

Hey, I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Check out my Podcast (click and press play)

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

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Lanreotide for Lung NETs – SPINET Trial


Somatuline (Lanreotide)

There’s been a lot of action in the area of what is termed Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (GEP-NETs).  It can therefore sometimes appear that Lung NETs are the poor relation.  There are certainly some unmet needs in this area of the anatomy including a lack of research.  Thus far, no prospective trials specifically for patients with lung NETs appear to have been reported.

However, there has been some recent movement. Last year, the use of Afinitor (Everolimus) was approved for progressive, non-functional NET of GI or Lung origin.

SPINET Trial for Lung NETs

In late 2016, I tipped you off about an Ipsen sponsored trial for Lung NETs involving Lanreotide (Somatuline) SPINET is a Phase 3, prospective, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, study evaluating the efficacy and safety of Lanreotide plus “Best Supportive Care” (BSC) versus placebo plus BSC for the treatment of well-differentiated, metastatic and/or unresectable, typical or atypical lung NETs.   The aim of the SPINET study is to evaluate the safety and antitumor efficacy of Lanreotide 120 mg in patients with advanced lung NETs.  I suspect that many Lung NET patients are already receiving somatostatin analogues (Octreotide/Lanreotide) but prescribed only for syndrome/symptom control.

SPINET is now recruiting in many locations (see below).

The countries involved in the SPINET trial are as follows (see the location details here in the trials document). Please also check the inclusion and exclusion criteria.

USA (21 locations)

Austria (1 location)

Canada (3 locations)

Denmark (2 locations – none recruiting yet)

France (7 locations)

Germany (4 locations)

Italy (5 locations – only one recruiting so far)

Netherlands (2 locations – none recruiting yet)

Poland (6 locations – none recruiting yet)

Spain (4 locations – only 2 recruiting so far)

UK (6 locations – only one recruiting so far)

In addition to the trial document linked above, you can read more about the SPINET trial here with commentary from a well-known NET Specialist – Dr Diane Reidy-Lagunes, who is the principal investigator for the trial.

How do I get on the trial?

You may be interested in this organisation – Trialbee.  They are a company helping Ipsen to raise awareness of the SPINET trial using a cloud based platform to connect patients, investigators and sponsors (I’ve authenticated their participation with Ipsen).  There is no fee for using their services.  There’s a useful questionnaire which can help you decide if this trial is for you – here.

Please note, if you are concerned about participating in clinical trials, you should always consult your specialist for advice.  

Thanks for reading

 

If you are a patient advocate or an advocate organisation, please share with your communities in order that Lung NET patients are at least made aware of the trial.

 

Ronny

Don’t forget to VOTE FOR ME in the 2017 WEGO Health Awards – click here

Hey, I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Check out my Podcast (click and press play)

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

community_titled_transparent_2013-10-22

NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter JULY 2017


 

Hi NETworkers!

Welcome to my monthly ‘Community’ newsletter. This is July 2017’s monthly summary of Ronny Allan’s Community news, views and ICYMI (in case you missed it!).  July 26th was the ‘Cancerversary‘ of my diagnosis – I’m still here after 7 years and I’m apparently a veritable newbie!  There’s some great comments on my ‘I’m Still Here’ post – check them out … ‘click here’

NET News

The following news items may be of interest:

  • Telotristat Ethyl (Xermelo) takes a step forward to being approved in Europe. Click here.
  • PRRT takes a step forward to being approved in USA.  Click here.
  • Ipsen launches the German version of ‘Living with NETs’ website.  Click here.

What’s happening on my Blog Site?  

As per above, a quiet month.  Due to the vagaries of Facebook inner workings, some of these may not have even shown on your timeline.  So, ICYMI …….here’s a summary with links, includes updated blogs.

There’s a lot of chatter about use of the word ‘fight’ in cancer parlance but most people are misrepresenting the word’s multiple meanings as per the most eminent English language dictionaries.  As for me, I’m ‘sticking to my guns’ on the subject.

I got some great comments on my monthly Lanreotide ‘butt dart’ post.  Feel free to add questions.  I may know some of the answers and cannot promise answers from Ipsen due to their regulatory arrangements but I will try!  Check out the discussion here …… ‘click here’

NET Cancer Blog Activity

July was a slower month in ‘new’ blogging terms mainly due to holiday.  I’m seeing a trend of low ‘new’ blog months, mainly due to external projects and a continuous stream of offline messages from patients.  Also, I’m still suffering with minor pain which has decided to move to my right hip (hopefully localising where the real problem is).  Physiotherapist appointment is next week.  However, despite a low month for brand new blogs, I managed to totally smash my monthly blog view record (after smashing it last month too!)  ……..Thank you all so much for the support.

I continue to receive a steady flow of private contacts, mainly from patients seeking information.  I don’t have an issue with private contact but please note my disclaimer.  Please also note that I cannot accept telephone calls on a one to one basis.  The number of non-patients contacting me for other reasons (mainly to help with something) continues to grow and this is producing some great publicity and awareness.

I’ve been nominated for the 2017 WEGO Health Awards in three categories so far, Blog, Patient Leader Hero and Lifetime Achievement.  If you remember last year, I made it to the final in two categories of Blog and Community and won the latter.  A vote for me is a vote for Neuroendocrine Cancer awareness. VOTE HERE PLEASE

Click on ‘Endorse Ronny Allan’.  It defaults to ‘Blog’ but the other two are there via the drop down menu.  Thanks, I cannot get to the finals without the votes.

Awareness Activity in July 2017

New Audiences for NET Cancer.  From Day 1, I said it was my aim to find new audiences for NETS rather than just share stuff within our own community.

  • I’m ‘extremely’ active on twitter and I find a lot of my research stuff there. I also use it to support other conditions and it’s mostly returned (i.e. others help with NET awareness and are made aware of NETs in the process). There is so much on twitter that I could swamp the community Facebook site so I started a twitter newsletter via an app called Nuzzel which seeks out stuff I normally like. Click this link and sign up if you think this is something you’d be interested in receiving.  Currently 269 subscribers – up 12% on last month.
  • I continue to be featured by ‘external’ organisations such as WEGO and my PODCAST is reaching new audiences – click here.  Other irons are in the fire but unable to bring you firm news just yet.
  • I’m proud to be a ‘Community Champion’ on the Macmillan Cancer Support Forum helping outliers from the NET community there. I’ll be reporting more on this in the coming weeks.  This is the biggest cancer support organisation in the UK.
  • I’ve been accepted as a ‘Cure Today’ contributor which means my articles will get a wider distribution than they do now.  I’ve not contributed yet but clearly they will be posted on all my social media outlets for you to read.  Click here to read more.

Speaking Engagements

  • On 12 July, I delivered a ‘patient view’ presentation to Ipsen (UK) which was well received.
  • On 5th October, I’ve been invited to speak for around an hour at the Cardiff (South Wales) NET Patient meeting (moved from July due to forecast low attendance)  Things are starting to happen in this area and I already know Dr Mo Khan who is a NET specialist working hard on behalf of patients.  I’m really looking forward to visiting and talking to this group.

Me with some very nice Ipsen people! 12 July 2017 in London

Writing and other types of Engagement (external) – watch this space as I’m working on quite a few projects concurrently

Remember …….

Social Media and Stats

Blog Milestone.  In July, I tipped a THIRD OF A MILLION views! Thank you all so much Keep sharing! On track for 400000 by end of the year.

Facebook Milestone.  I met my target of 5000 followers a few months before my self inposed deadline date.  I’m very grateful!  The Facebook page is now my biggest outlet for awareness and education so please please please recommend this page to anyone you think would be interested.

Instagram

I’m expanding into Instagram to see how that goes. I’ve amassed over 200 followers to date. Initially, I’ll just be posting pictures of things that inspire me, mostly scenic photos of places I’ve been or want to go!  You can follow me here:  Click here to go to my Instagram page

Medicine

Figures

  • Facebook 5007.  This is a key outlet for my blog – please encourage others to like my page (if you’d like to know how to use your Facebook to invite others to my page – let me know, I can provide you with a step by step approach). Please also join my 2017 awareness campaign event here (select ‘Going’)
  • Twitter4000 / 3095 Follow me here @RonnyAllan1 / @NETCancerBlog
  • Total Blog Views: 337313
  • Blog with most views: 12323The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer 
  • Most blog views in one day:  2043 on 15 January 2017.  Why the spike? ….. The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer” 
  • Most blog views in one week: 7538 in July 2017.
  • Most blog views in one month: 20498 in July 2017.  Why the spike? … these blogs here:
Home page / Archives More stats 2,482
Neuroendocrine Cancer Syndromes – Early Signs of a Late Diagnosis More stats 1,418
Steve Jobs – the most famous Neuroendocrine Cancer Ambassador we NEVER had More stats 1,326
Diagnosed with Neuroendocrine Cancer? 10 questions to ask your doctor More stats 1,253
Neuroendocrine Cancer – Incurable vs. Terminal More stats 1,212
Neuroendocrine Neoplasms – Grade and Stage (incorporating WHO 2017 changes) More stats 985
I’m still here More stats 869
Neuroendocrine Cancer Nutrition Blog 2 – Gastrointestinal Malabsorption More stats 846
Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer – Home Page More stats 824
Ignore this post about Neuroendocrine Cancer More stats 763
The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer More stats 759

 

WOW!  – that’s an amazing amount of awareness and hopefully, support for others.  However, I cannot do this without you guys liking, commenting and sharing!  The likes give me motivation, the comments (and private messages) give me inspiration (or at least a chance to explain further) and the sharing gives me a bigger platform.  A bigger platform generates more awareness.

Thanks for your great support in July.  Onwards and upwards!

Thanks for reading

Ronny

Hey, I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Check out my Podcast (click and press play)

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

community_titled_transparent_2013-10-22

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