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Did you mean to lose weight?


Weight – The NET Effect

Firstly, let me say that I have no intention of advising you how to lose or gain weight!  Rather, I’d like to discuss what factors might be involved in losing or gaining weight either at diagnosis or after treatment.  I can also talk freely about my own experience with my condition and associated weight issues. If nothing else, it might help some in thinking about what is causing their own weight issues.

I wrote a patient story for an organisation over 3 years ago and it started with the words used as the title of this blog.  Those were actually the words my asthma nurse said to me after I nonchalantly told her I thought I’d lost some weight (….about half a stone).  I said “no” and this response triggered a sequence of events that led to all the stories in all the posts in this blog (i.e. my diagnosis).  I can’t remember at which point I started to lose the weight but I was initially reported to have Iron Deficiency Anemia due to a low hemoglobin result and my subsequent iron test (Serum Ferritin) was also low and out of normal range.  This, combined with the weight loss, the GP was spot on by referring me to a clinic.  The sequence of events during the referral led to a diagnosis of metastatic NETs (Small Intestine Primary). If I had been a betting man, I would have put money on my GP thinking “Colorectal Cancer”.  So my adage “If your doctors don’t suspect something, they won’t detect anything” applies.

I was diagnosed at a weight of 11 st 7 lbs (161 lbs or 73 kg). Spoiler alert, I’m now 10 st 7 lbs (147 lbs or 66 kg).  I can also tell you that I weigh myself most days at the same time using the same scales.  I won’t be caught out again!

Why did I lose weight?

I had major surgery about 10 weeks after diagnosis.  When I left the hospital after my 19 day stay, I was a whole stone lighter (14 lbs or 6.3 kg).  I guess 3 feet of intestine, the cecum, an ascending colon, a bit of a transverse colon together with an army of lymph nodes and other abdominal ‘gubbins’ actually weighs a few pounds.  However, add the gradual introduction of foods to alleviate pressure on the ‘new plumbing’, and this is also going to have an effect on weight.  I remember my Oncologist after the surgery saying to use full fat milk – the context is lost in memory but I guess he was trying to help me put weight back on.  I also vividly remember many of my clothes not fitting me after this surgery. In fact, since 2010, I’ve actually dropped 2 trouser sizes and one shirt/jumper size.  I did spend a lot of time in the toilet over the coming months, so I guess that had an impact!  The commencement of Lanreotide in Dec 2010 did introduce another side effect which complicated the issues caused by my ‘new plumbing’ – malabsorption.

I started to put on some weight in time for my next big surgery – a liver resection.  The average adult liver weighs 1.5 kg so I lost another 1 kg in one day based on a 66% liver resection.  However, what was also going on was something that took me a while to figure out – malabsorption and vitamin/mineral deficiency.  That knowledge led me to understand some of the more esoteric nutritional issues that can have a big effect on NET patients and actually lead to a host of side effects that might be confused with one of the several NET syndromes.  What it also confirmed to me was that I could still eat foods I enjoy without worrying too much about the effect on my remnant tumours or the threat of a recurrence of my carcinoid syndrome, something I was experiencing prior to and after diagnosis.

I did eventually adjust my diet and my weight has now flat-lined at around 10 st 7 lbs (give or take 1 or 2 lbs fluctuation). I actually lost half a stone (7 lbs or 3.5 kg) in 2014 whilst training for an 84 mile charity walk – many commented that I looked thin and gaunt.  It took several months to put the weight back on but at least I knew what was causing the loss. I don’t have any appetite issues although I try to avoid big meals due to a shorter gut, so I snack more.  With the exception of the 4 months of intense training for the 84 mile hike, I cannot seem to lose or gain weight.  As my current weight is bang in the middle of the BMI green zone (healthy), I’m content.

Why do NET patients lose weight?

That’s a tricky one but any authoritative resource will confirm fairly obvious things such as (but not limited to) loss of appetite and side effects of cancer treatments.  NETs can be complex so I resorted to researching the ISI Book on NETs, a favourite resource of mine.  I wanted to check out any specific mentions of weight and NETs whether at diagnosis or beyond. Here’s some of the things I found out:

Carcinoid Syndrome.  Weight loss is listed but not as high a percentage as I thought – although it tends to be tied into those affected most with diarrhea.

Gastrinoma/Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome.  Up to half of these patients will have weight loss at diagnosis.

Glucagonoma.  90% will have weight loss.

Pheochromocytoma.   Weight loss is usual.

Somatostatinoma.  Weight loss in one-third of pancreatic cases and one-fifth in intestinal cases.

VIPoma.  Weight loss is usual.

MEN Syndromes.  One of the presentational symptoms can be weight loss.

Secondary Effects of NETs.  Many NETs can result in diabetes (particularly certain pNETs) and as somatostatin analogues can inhibit insulin, it could push those at borderline levels into formal diabetic levels.  In people with diabetes, insufficient insulin prevents the body from getting glucose from the blood into the body’s cells to use as energy. When this occurs, the body starts burning fat and muscle for energy, causing a reduction in overall body weight.

It must be emphasised that there will always be exceptions and the above will not apply to every single patient with one of the above.

What about weight gain?

You always associate weight loss with cancer patients but there are some types of NETs and associated syndromes which might actually cause weight gain.  Here’s what I found from ISI and other sources (as mentioned):

Cushing’s Syndrome.  Centripetal weight gain is mentioned.  (Centripetal – tends to the centre of the body).  I also noted that Cushing’s Syndrome tends to be much more prevalent in females. Cushing’s syndrome comprises the signs and symptoms caused by excessive amounts of the hormone cortisol (hypercortisolism) or by an overdosage of drugs known as glucocorticoids.

Insulinoma. Weight gain occurs in around 40% of cases, because patients may eat frequently to avoid symptoms.  However, according to an Insulinoma support group site, I did note that after treatment (some stability), things can improve.

Again, it must be emphasised that there will always be exceptions and the above will not apply to every single patient with one of the above.

The NETs Jigsaw

Like anything in NETs, things can get complex.  So it is entirely possible that weight loss or weight gain is directly caused by NETs, can be caused by side effects/secondary effects of treatment, and it’s also possible that it could be something unrelated to NETs (Dr Liu “Even NET patients get regular illnesses“).  I guess some people might have a good idea of the reason for theirs – my initial weight loss was without doubt caused by the cancer and the post diagnostic issues caused by the consequences of the cancer.

Summary

I guess that weight loss or weight gain can be a worry. I also suspect that people might be happy to lose or gain weight if they were under/over weight before diagnosis (every cloud etc).  However, if you are progressively losing weight, I encourage you to seek advice soonest or ask to see a dietician (preferably one who understands NETs).

 

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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4 Comments

  1. Jean Rodda says:

    Thanks for this post, Ronny. I started Lanreotide in January 2017, then somewhere around May or June, I began to lose weight. I’ve had to adjust my eating, ie. remove added sugars and most dairy, to prevent pain in the gall bladder area or pancreas area, but certainly not enough change to warrant the 15 pounds that I’ve lost. I’m thinking, based on your post, that it may be the cumulative effect of the Lanreotide over the first few months. And on my next doctor’s appointment, I will try to get an appointment with a dietician to see if there is something that I can to do to mitigate the weight loss. I don’t mind the weight loss, but I do not want to be malnourished.

    http://i0.poll.fm/js/rating/rating.js

    Liked by 1 person

  2. shirley foster says:

    love your blogs Ronnie! good luck

    Like

  3. Good ramble in prep for the wall ramble next week…

    Like

  4. Neil Colville says:

    Good to hear you are still in light training. I purposely lost almost a stone before Xmas as I suddenly found that some of my 34″ trousers had shrunk. Cut out chocolate biscuits and the Mars bars and Snickers that we consumed after the first 9 holes, 3 or 4 times a week. Dipped below 12st last month but risen slightly since. Fingers crossed it was the lack of calories in sweet bars.

    Like

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