Home » Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer » PRRT – The Sequel? – Phase 1 trial of Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy (TAT) – 212 Pb-AR-RMX

PRRT – The Sequel? – Phase 1 trial of Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy (TAT) – 212 Pb-AR-RMX

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Radioimmunotherapy

RadioMedix Inc. and AREVA Med (not Orano Med) announced the initiation in the United States of Phase 1 trial for AlphaMedixTM in patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR) positive Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs). AlphaMedixTM is composed of a somatostatin analogue radiolabeled with 212Pb, an isotope used for Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy (TAT).  This open-label, dose escalation study’s objective is to determine safety, bio-distribution, and preliminary effectiveness of 212 Pb-AR-RMX in adult patients with differentiated (sic) NETs. “Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy (TAT) is the wave of the future in nuclear oncology and has a tremendous potential to treat patients with NET and overcome some of the limitations of current Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT)” said Dr. Ebrahim S. Delpassand, Chairman and CEO of RadioMedix, sponsor of the trial. They further announced on 21 Feb 2018 that the first patients had undergone some treatment.

What is Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy?  Targeted Alpha Therapy is based on the coupling of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes to tumour selective carrier molecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or peptides. These molecules have the ability to selectively target tumour cells even if they are spread throughout the body. They recognize the targeted cancer cells through antigens that are expressed on the cell surface and can bind selectively to these cells, similar a key fitting into a lock. In targeted alpha therapy these carrier molecules serve as vehicles to transport the radioisotopes to the cancer cells. This is called the “magic bullet” approach. Radioisotopes that emit alpha particles seem particularly promising to selectively destroy cancer cells. Alpha particles have a high energy in the range of 5-9 MeV and at the same time a very short path length in human tissue below 0.1 mm, corresponding to less than 10 cell diameters. Consequently, the use of alpha emitters allows the specific targeting and killing of individual malignant cells, while minimizing the toxicity to surrounding healthy tissue. Extracted from EU Science Hub

What is the difference between PRRT and TAT?  From the scant ‘patient understandable’ information currently available, it would appear that TAT has the potential to be more targeted and less toxic than PRRT – to me that seems like it would be able to target smaller tumors.  I also noted that TAT is sometimes described as a ‘radioimmuotherapy’ or ‘alpha immunotherpy’, indicating the mechanism of action is significantly different to that of conventional PRRT. It was also described as a ‘Trojan Horse’ which would seem to hint at its immunotherapy credentials.

I noted that TAT is also being studied for use in Prostate Cancer and Leukaemia.

Related articles:

Announcement of Phase 1 Clinical Trial – click here

Phase 1 Clinical Trial Document (to follow)

Areva Med Website – click here

RadioMedix Inc Website – click here

You may also enjoy my articles:

Waiting on Lu-177 PRRT?” – click here.
Expanding PRRT” – click here.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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6 Comments

  1. Betty says:

    has anyone already undergone PRRT treatment? My spouse is looking at that once the insurance company okays it, and I was wondering what the after effects are like…. any info would be great. He really had a month of pure exhaustion after his bland embolisation procedure, and some heart abnormalities to deal with….

    Liked by 1 person

  2. michaelklouda says:

    Thanks for the info. Looks like I am heading to Switzerland for PRRT very soon, but this new treatment sounds interesting and promising.

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    Liked by 1 person

  3. Tony McGrory says:

    Great stuff, onwards & upwards. T

    On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 at 19:32, Ronny Allan – Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer wrote:

    > Ronny Allan posted: ” RadioMedix Inc. and AREVA Med today announced the > initiation in the United States of Phase 1 trial for AlphaMedixTM in > patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR) positive Neuroendocrine Tumors > (NETs). AlphaMedixTM is composed of a somatostatin analogue ” >

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    Liked by 1 person

  4. Stephen Don Jolliff says:

    Thanks! Have tried several different treatments to no avail so will show my oncologist when I see him next week. DX 2 years ago.

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    Liked by 1 person

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